Skip to content

  Home > Binding > Hardcover >

Campidoglio:: Michelangelos Roman Capital
Campidoglio:: Michelangelos Roman Capital Alexander Liberman 0679430520 9780679430520 The Campidoglio, the Roman Capitol, stands on the peak of the smallest of Romes seven hills. The epicenter of the Roman Empire, it was transform
Stock Image - Actual Cover May Vary
 

Campidoglio:: Michelangelos Roman Capital by Alexander Liberman

The Campidoglio, the Roman Capitol, stands on the peak of the smallest of Romes seven hills. The epicenter of the Roman Empire, it was transformed by Michelangelo into one of the most imposing architectural compositions of all time, grand environment for the political life of a great city. Michelangelos design for the Piazza del Campidoglio was one of the first efforts to make a public space in which all the elements function as a whole. At the center of a trapezoidal area, flanked by three palaces, was the ancient Roman equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, the second-century ruler who presided over the waning clays of the empire. Alexander Liberman has photographed the statue and its environs in all kinds of light and from all angles over a period of years. The result is a stunning photographic essay on one of the most dramatic monuments ever constructed. Of all the Roman emperors, Marcus Aurelius gets the best press, Joseph Brodsky writes in the witty and profound essay that accompanies Libermans photographs. Historians love him, and so do philosophers. He was the model philosopher-king, remembered now mostly for his Meditations, writings on morality, virtue, and rationality. If that book hasnt civilized us, what will? Brodsky notes. A supplementary text on the art and architecture of the Campidoglio formed by Michelangelo into one of the most imposing architectural compositions of all time, a grand environment for the political life of a great city. Michelangelos design for the Piazza del Campidoglio was one of the first efforts to make a public space in which all the elements function as a whole. At the center of a trapezoidal area, flanked by three palaces, was the ancient Roman equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, the second-century ruler who presided over the waning days of the empire. Alexander Liberman has photographed the statue and its environs in all kinds of light and from all angles over a period of years. The result is a stunning photographic essay on one of the most dramatic public monuments ever constructed. Of all the Roman emperors, Marcus Aurelius gets the best press, Joseph Brodsky writes in the witty and profound essay that accompanies Libermans photographs. Historians love him, and so do philosophers. He was the model philosopher-king, remembered now mostly for his Meditations, writings on morality, virtue, and rationality. If that book hasnt civilized us, what will? Brodsky notes. A supplementary text on the art and architecture of the Campidoglio has been contributed by Diane Kelder.

Author: Alexander Liberman

Language: English

Edition: 1

Binding: Hardcover

Pages: 205

Publisher: Random House

Publication Date: 1994-11-22

Our Price: $4.09

Quantity:1
ISBN: 0679430520


Condition:
Like-New [Add $0.60]
Very-Good [Add $0.40]
Good [Add $0.20]
Acceptable

Quantity:  
Description
 
Alexander Liberman (Edition: 1) Hardcover


Browse for more products in the same category as this item:

Binding > Hardcover

* Free Shipping applies to all orders shipped to the contiguous 48 United States. Variable shipping rates apply to Alaska, Hawaii, and the American Territories (Puerto Rico, Guam, American Samoa, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and the Northern Mariana Islands) as well as International orders shipped to countries other than the USA.